DMG events launches key food innovation conference to the market’

DMG EVENTS LAUNCHES KEY FOOD INNOVATION CONFERENCE TO THE MARKET

22 AUGUST 2018

 

NEWS RELEASE

DMG EVENTS LAUNCHES KEY FOOD INNOVATION CONFERENCE TO THE MARKET

dmg events is proud to introduce the most exciting b2b conference to the food and beverage market. From 27 – 28 September 2018, FoodNext.Africa will bring together startups, food innovators, foodtech businesses, investors and partners who are redefining the food industry from farm-to-fork.

FoodNext.Africa is built around an agenda of critical debate with key personalities and businesses providing insights into how to embrace distribution, scaling up of new projects and meeting the rapidly changing needs of consumers. Themes for the conference include investment, farming disruption, the future of food, disruptive distribution models, personalised nutrition, trends in retailing, innovative packaging and technology.

“The FoodNext.Africa product spawned from our food and beverage exhibition Africa’s Big 7 which ran in June this year. We identified a need for a platform where food startups and innovators can meet investors and partners in a forum of collaboration and networking. FoodNext.Africa is this very platform and ideal for our industry at this time of accelerated expansion and change,” said Brad Hook, Divisional Director of dmg events.

FoodNext.Africa provides delegates with expert speakers including Ailyssa Pretorius, General manager of Uber Eats SA; Dr. Yael Joffe, Chief Scientific Officer of 3X4 Analytics; Manuel Koser, Co-Founder & MD of Slivertree Internet holdings; Michelle Adelman, Founder of Accite; Dr. Dirk Troskie, Director of business planning and strategy of Western Cape Department of Agriculture; Xolile Mbathe, Research, Nutrition & Technology Director of Kellogg’s SA and Bruce Cohen, Founder of Absolute Organix.

One session attracting a lot of interest is the “Food on the move” panel discussion focusing on how ‘dark kitchens’ are changing the rules of engagement and what it means for business. The session goes into detail about how the F&B industry is undergoing a massive shift with consumers testing non-traditional business models, changing product preferences, demanding high quality, more safe and sustainable food, and how the business model is adapting.

The conference also provides startups the chance to pitch their business in between specific sessions providing the necessary exposure to the investors and partners in the forum.

Join your industry from 27-28 September at CTICC, Cape Town for 2 days of networking, learn from 40 top leading minds, take part in 10 in-depth discussions, hear from 8 startups and join in on the investment briefing breakfast.

Visit www.foodnextlive.com for more information and to book your seat.

To read the full article click here News Release Food Next Africa

JOINT submission on Tobacco Bill

JOINT SUBMISSION ON TOBACCO BILL

13 AUGUST 2018

 

XX August 2018

JOINT SUBMISSION ON THE
DRAFT CONTROL OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS AND ELECTRONIC DELIVERY SYSTEMS BILL, 2018 AND ITS
ACCOMPANYING SOCIO-ECONOMIC IMPACT ASSESSMENT

We, the undersigned, submit that the Draft Control of Tobacco Products and Electronic Delivery Systems Bill, 2018, is problematic and should be set aside for the following reasons:

  • Section 2(1) violates personal freedom by effectively banning smoking across South Africa, with a very limited number of places remaining where smoking can legally take place. The provision empowering the Minister to designate any area in the country as a non-smoking area is furthermore unacceptable because it falls foul of the section 1(c) commitment to the Rule of Law found in the Constitution. This power is too broad and untethered.
  • Section 2(1)(e) which prohibits smoking in private homes if there is commercial childcare activity, domestic employment, or schooling that takes place in those homes, is furthermore rife with ambiguity and will yield devastating unintended consequences. It is unclear whether smoking is prohibited if there is childcare activity, domestic employment, or schooling at all, or whether it is simply prohibited in the presence of those children or domestic employees. If it is banned outright (regardless of whether the children or domestic employees are actually present), then it is highly likely that smokers will prefer to be able to smoke, rather than continuing their commercial childcare activity, domestic employment, or schooling, which will be disastrous for employment, education outcomes, and economic growth.
  • Section 3(5)(a) bans displaying relevant products (tobacco and electronic delivery systems) and forces consumers to request the product, which will presumably have to be retrieved from a backroom. This provision has two problematic components: it violates the dignity of consumers by relegating their preferred products to the shadowy corners of the market rather than out in the open; and this provision will be impossible to comply with by small and micro-businesses like spaza and street-side shops, which do not have the infrastructure for backrooms or storage facilities. While this provision will likely be ignored, where enforcement occurs, it stands to have devastating consequences for the informal economy.
  • Section 3(6) effectively bans automated vending machines that dispense relevant products. No reasoning is provided for this apparently arbitrary infringement on the right to choose one’s trade and profession, as contained in section 22 of the Constitution.
  • The plain packaging provisions in section 4 are condescending toward consumers and will have more disastrous unintended consequences. By prohibiting manufacturers from advertising their brands and the fact that some brands are less harmful than others, those manufacturers will stop competing with one another on the basis of health and safety. Their focus will shift to cutting manufacturing costs as far as possible so as to compete on price, rather than providing a better product than their indistinguishable competitors.

To read more click for more on the  JOINT submission on Tobacco Bill